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Today’s Badass: Matthew J. DeYoung, Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps

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Matthew DeYoung was born on May 20, 1984, in Toms River, New Jersey. He enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps on November 29, 2004, and completed basic training at MCRD San Diego, California, in February 2005. Pvt DeYoung next attended the School of Infantry at Camp Pendleton, California, in March 2005, followed by Helicopter/Tilt-Rotor Mechanic training at CNATT Jacksonville, Florida, from March to July 2005. His first assignment was as a helicopter/tilt-rotor mechanic with Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 39 (MALS-39) of Marine Aircraft Group 39 (MAG-39) at Camp Pendleton from July 2005 to April 2009, and during this time he deployed to Kuwait and Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from January to August 2006, and from October 2007 to May 2008. After additional training from May to November 2009, Sgt DeYoung served as a Reconnaissance Man and Assistant Team Leader with 3d Platoon, Company A, 2d Reconnaissance Battalion of the 2d Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, from November 2009 to November 2010, and then deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom from November 2010 until he was killed in action in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, on February 18, 2011. He was buried at Eagle Point National Cemetery in Eagle Point, Oregon.

His Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal w/Valor Citation reads:

For heroic achievement in the superior performance of his duties while serving as Assistant Team Leader, 3d Platoon, Company A, 2d Reconnaissance Battalion, 2d Marine Division (Forward) from November 2010 to February 2011 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Sergeant DeYoung displayed exceptional leadership during combat operations against the enemy in the Sangin District of Helmand Province. On 14 December, as the enemy prepared to attack his patrol base, Sergeant DeYoung placed his Marines into position to repel the action. The combination of his tactical foresight and personal actions repelled the attack and ensured the security of his platoon. The next day, one of his Marines was struck by an improvised explosive device. Sprinting through uncleared terrain, Sergeant DeYoung provided life saving first aid to the Marine until he could be evacuated. On 17 February, while moving to occupy an overwatch position, he was mortally wounded by an improvised explosive device. Sergeant DeYoung’s initiative, perseverance, and total dedication to duty reflected credit upon him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

MatthewJDeYoungRibbons

 

Always keep your Front Toward Enemy,

What’s your enemy?

Today’s Badass: Hector A. Cafferata, Jr., Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps

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Hector Cafferata was born on November 4, 1929, in New York City, New York. He enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve on February 15, 1948, and served with the 21st Infantry Battalion at Dover, New Jersey, until being activated on September 7, 1950. PFC Cafferata departed the U.S. in October 1950, and landed at Wonson, South Korea, in November 1950, where he served with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division until he was badly wounded during the Battle of Chosin Reservoir on November 28, 1950. He was evacuated to Japan in December 1950, and to U.S. Naval Base Brooklyn, New York, in January 1951, where he recuperated until being medically retired from the Marine Corps on September 1, 1951.

His Medal of Honor Citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a rifleman with Company F, in action against enemy aggressor forces. When all the other members of his fire team became casualties, creating a gap in the lines, during the initial phase of a vicious attack launched by a fanatical enemy of regimental strength against his company’s hill position, Pvt. Cafferata waged a lone battle with grenades and rifle fire as the attack gained momentum and the enemy threatened penetration through the gap and endangered the integrity of the entire defensive perimeter. Making a target of himself under the devastating fire from automatic weapons, rifles, grenades, and mortars, he maneuvered up and down the line and delivered accurate and effective fire against the onrushing force, killing 15, wounding many more, and forcing the others to withdraw so that reinforcements could move up and consolidate the position. Again fighting desperately against a renewed onslaught later that same morning when a hostile grenade landed in a shallow entrenchment occupied by wounded marines, Pvt. Cafferata rushed into the gully under heavy fire, seized the deadly missile in his right hand and hurled it free of his comrades before it detonated, severing part of 1 finger and seriously wounding him in the right hand and arm. Courageously ignoring the intense pain, he staunchly fought on until he was struck by a sniper’s bullet and forced to submit to evacuation for medical treatment Stouthearted and indomitable, Pvt. Cafferata, by his fortitude, great personal valor, and dauntless perseverance in the face of almost certain death, saved the lives of several of his fellow marines and contributed essentially to the success achieved by his company in maintaining its defensive position against tremendous odds. His extraordinary heroism throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.

HectorACafferataJrRibbons

Always keep your Front Toward Enemy,

What’s your enemy?

Today’s Badass: Shamus O. Goare, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army

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Shamus Goare was born on May 28, 1976, in Mount Vernon, Ohio. He enlisted in the U.S. Army on August 11, 1994, and completed basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, in October 1994. Pvt Goare attended UH-1 Iroquois helicopter repairer training at Fort Rucker, Alabama, from October to December 1994, followed by service as a UH-1 repairer with Company I of the 158th Aviation Battalion from December 1994 to October 1996. His next assignment was as a UH-1 crew chief with the 1st U.S. Army Support Battalion, Multinational Force and Observers, on the Sinai Peninsula of Egypt from October 1996 to October 1997, and then as a UH-1 crew chief with Company B of the 12th Aviation Battalion at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, from November 1997 to January 1999. After completing the CH-47 Chinook Heavy Helicopter Repairer Course at Fort Eustis, Virginia, Sgt Goare served as a CH-47 crew chief with Company C of the 52nd Aviation Regiment at Camp Humphreys, South Korea, from June 1999 to June 2000, followed by service as an MH-47 crew chief with Company C and then Company B, 3rd Battalion of the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) at Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia, from June 2000 until he was killed in action during Operation Red Wings in Afghanistan on June 28, 2005. Shamus Goare was buried at the Saint Luke’s Cemetery in Danville, Ohio.

His Meritorious Service Medal Citation reads:

For exceptionally meritorious service while assigned to Bravo Company, 3d Battalion, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne). Staff Sergeant Goare’s superior leadership, extraordinary dedication to duty, and exceptional technical expertise resulted in an unparalleled record of service to the nation. His actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne), the United States Army Special Operations Command, and the United States Army.

His 2nd (of 4) Air Medal Citation reads:

For exceptional aviation knowledge and skill in a combat environment while executing an emergency humanitarian relief mission for CJSOTF in Northern Afghanistan while serving as flight engineer of a multi-aircraft flight. His superior aviation maintenance and load planning, aircraft mission preparation, and skills in flight resulted in the successful insertion of doctors and emergency vaccine to save hundreds of children’s lives in the most restrictive terrain of Northern Afghanistan. Sergeant Goare’s professionalism and airmanship are in keeping with the motto “NIGHT STALKERS DON’T QUIT” and reflect distinct credit upon himself, the United States Army Special Operations Command, and the United States Army.

ShamusOGoareRibbons

Always keep your Front Toward Enemy,

What’s your enemy?

Today’s Badass: Jason D. Cunningham, Senior Airman, U.S. Air Force

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Jason Cunningham was born on March 27, 1975, in Carlsbad, New Mexico. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy in July 1993 and went on active duty beginning July 13, 1994. After training as an Aviation Boatswain’s Mate, he served at NSA Naples, Italy, from January 1995 until he left active duty on July 12, 1998. Cunningham then enlisted in the U.S. Air Force on February 26, 1999, and was trained as a Pararescueman. After completing his training, he was assigned to the 38th Rescue Squadron of the 247th Operations Group at Moody AFB, Georgia, where he served from June 2001 until he was killed in action during the opening days of the War on Terrorism in Afghanistan on March 4, 2002. SRA Cunningham was buried at Arlington National Cemetery. He left behind a wife, the former Theresa DeCastro, and two daughters, Kayla and Hannah.

His Air Force Cross Citation reads:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Title 10, Section 8742, U.S.C., awards the Air Force Cross to Senior Airman Jason D. Cunningham for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as a pararescueman near the village of Marzak in the Paktia Province of Afghanistan on 4 March 2002. On that proud day, Airman Cunningham was the primary Air Force Combat Search and Rescue medic assigned to a Quick Reaction Force tasked to recover two American servicemen evading capture in austere terrain occupied by massed Al Qaida and Taliban forces. Shortly before landing, his MH-47E helicopter received accurate rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fire, severely disabling the aircraft and causing it to crash land. The assault force formed a hasty defense and immediately suffered three fatalities and five critical casualties. Despite effective enemy fire, and at great risk to his own life, Airman Cunningham remained in the burning fuselage of the aircraft in order to treat the wounded. As he moved his patients to a more secure location, mortar rounds began to impact within fifty feet of his position. Disregarding this extreme danger, he continued the movement and exposed himself to enemy fire on seven separate occasions. When the second casualty collection point was also compromised, in a display of uncommon valor and gallantry, Airman Cunningham braved an intense small arms and rocket-propelled grenade attack while repositioning the critically wounded to a third collection point. Even after he was mortally wounded and quickly deteriorating, he continued to direct patient movement and transferred care to another medic. In the end, his distinct efforts led to the successful delivery of ten gravely wounded Americans to life-saving medical treatment. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, and in the dedication of his service to his country, Senior Airman Cunningham reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

JasonDCunninghamRibbons

Always keep your Front Toward Enemy,

What’s your enemy?

Today’s Badass: Matthew G. Axelson, Petty Officer 2nd Class, U.S. Navy

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Matt Axelson was born on June 25, 1976, in Cupertino, California. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy on December 28, 2000, and completed basic training at Recruit Training Command Great Lakes, Illinois, in March 2001. After completing Fleet Antisubmarine Warfare Training in April 2001, Axelson went through SEAL training, Airborne training, and SEAL Vehicle Delivery Team training before being assigned to SEAL Vehicle Delivery Team ONE at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in May 2002. PO2 Axelson deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in April 2005, and he was killed in action during Operation Red Wings on June 28, 2005. Matt Axelson was buried at the Glen Oaks Memorial Park in Chico, California.

His Navy Cross Citation reads:

For extraordinary heroism in actions against the enemy while serving in a four-man Special Reconnaissance element with SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team ONE, Naval Special Warfare Task Unit, Afghanistan from 27 to 28 June 2005. Petty Officer Axelson demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the face of grave danger in the vicinity of Asadabad, Konar Province, Afghanistan. Operating in the middle of an enemy-controlled area, in extremely rugged terrain, his Special Reconnaissance element was tasked with locating a high-level Anti-Coalition Militia leader, in support of a follow-on direct action mission to disrupt enemy activity. On 28 June 2005, the element was spotted by Anti-Coalition Militia sympathizers, who immediately revealed their position to the militia fighters. As a result, the element directly encountered the enemy. Demonstrating exceptional resolve and fully understanding the gravity of the situation, Petty Officer Axelson’s element bravely engaged the militia, who held both a numerical and positional advantage. The ensuing firefight resulted in numerous enemy personnel killed, with several of the Navy members suffering casualties. Ignoring his injuries and demonstrating exceptional composure, Petty Officer Axelson advised the teammate closest to him to escape while he provided cover fire. With total disregard for his own life and thinking only of his teammate’s survival, he continued to attack the enemy, eliminating additional militia fighters, until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. A champion of freedom, Petty Officer Axelson will be remembered for his self-sacrificing actions in the continuing Global War on Terrorism. By his undaunted courage, fortitude under fire, and unwavering dedication to duty, Petty Officer Axelson reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for the cause of freedom.

MatthewGAxelsonRibbons

Always keep your Front Toward Enemy,

What’s your enemy?

Today’s Badass: Michael J. Buras, Senior Airman, U.S. Air Force

DOD announces Nellis AFB casualty

Michael Buras was born on July 28, 1987, in Tifton, Georgia. He enlisted in the U.S. Air Force on April 11, 2006, and after completing basic training at Lackland AFB, Texas, he was trained as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) technician at Eglin AFB, Florida, from July 2006 to June 2007. His first assignment was as an EOD technician with the 99th Civil Engineer Squadron at Nellis AFB, Nevada, from June 2007 until he was killed in action in Kandahar, Afghanistan, on September 21, 2010. During this time SRA Buras deployed 3 times in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. He was buried at Andersonville National Cemetery in Andersonville, Georgia.

His 2nd Army Commendation Medal w/Valor Citation reads:

For exceptional valorous achievement during Operation Enduring Freedom on 10 August 2009. The outstanding professionalism, military bearing, and ceaseless efforts of Senior Airman Buras resulted in major contributions to the effectiveness and success of counter improvised explosive device operations. His actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, 755 Air Expeditionary Group Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight, Operating Location Alpha, 741st Explosive Ordnance Disposal Battalion, Combined Joint Task Force Paladin, and the United States Air Force.

MichaelJBurasRibbons

Always keep your Front Toward Enemy,

What’s your enemy?

Today’s Badass: Harold G. Bennett, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army

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Harold Bennett was born on October 16, 1940, in Thornburg, Arkansas. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1957, and served in the Armor Branch before going through Special Forces and Ranger training in 1963. He served as a Special Forces Advisor with the Military Assistance Command in South Vietnam from mid-1964 until he was captured and taken as a Prisoner of War on December 29, 1964. After three escape attempts and being held in captivity for 179 days, his Viet Cong captors executed him on June 25, 1965. His remains have never been returned to the United States.

 

His Silver Star Citation reads:

For gallantry in action from 29 December 1964 to 25 June 1965, while serving as a Ranger Advisor to the Vietnamese during the Vietnam War. On 29 December 1964, Staff Sergeant Bennett assisted two companies of the 33d Vietnamese Ranger Battalion in assaulting a powerful Viet Cong Force occupying the village of Binh Gia in Phuoc Tuy Province. En route, the Rangers were ambushed and overwhelmed by enemy forces employing mortars, recoilless rifles, and small arms fire. Staff Sergeant Bennett fearlessly traversed the battlefield, rallying survivors and calling in supporting fire from American gunships in the area. On two separate occasions, Staff Sergeant Bennett refused extraction, electing instead to stay behind and fight. He was eventually captured by the enemy. During his time in captivity, Staff Sergeant Bennett planned three separate escape attempts, the third of which resulted in his finger being bitten to the bone by the Viet Cong guard he was attempting to overcome. As a result of his tenacity and insubordination, Staff Sergeant Bennett was frequently blindfolded and beaten, given reduced rations and shackled in solitary confinement for prolonged periods. On 25 June 1965, the Viet Cong announced that they had executed Staff Sergeant Bennett in reprisal for the Saigon Government’s execution of a communist terrorist. Staff Sergeant Bennett’s valor and intrepidity during combat and his conspicuous courage and bravery while in captivity are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

HaroldGBennettRibbons

Always keep your Front Toward Enemy,

What’s your enemy?

Today’s Badass: John A. Chapman, Tech Sergeant, U.S. Air Force

John Chapman was born on July 14, 1965, in Springfield, Massachusetts, and grew up in Windsor Locks, Connecticut. He enlisted in the U.S. Air Force on September 27, 1985, and was trained as an Information Systems Operator. Chapman’s first assignment was with the 1987th Information Systems Squadron at Lowry AFB, Colorado, where he served from February 1986 to June 1989. He then cross-trained into the Combat Control career field and served with the 1721st Combat Control Squadron at Pope AFB, North Carolina, from August 1990 to November 1992. His next assignment was as a Special Tactics Team Member with the 320th Special Tactics Squadron at Kadena AB, Okinawa, from November 1992 to October 1995. Sgt Chapman’s final assignment was with the 24th Special Tactics Squadron at Pope AFB, where he served from October 1995 until he was killed in action in the opening days of the War on Terrorism in Afghanistan, on March 4, 2002. He was buried at the St. Mary Byzantine Cemetery in Windber, Pennsylvania. John married Valerie Novak of Windber, Pennsylvania, on August 22, 1992, and they had two children together, Madison and Brianna. On April 8, 1995, the container ship MV Merlin (T-AK 323) was renamed the MV TSgt John A. Chapman in his honor.

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His Air Force Cross Citation reads:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Title 10, Section 8742, U.S.C., awards the Air Force Cross to TSgt John Chapman for extraordinary heroism in military operation against an armed enemy of the United States as a 24th Special Tactics Squadron, Combat Controller in the vicinity of Gardez, in the eastern highlands of Afghanistan, on 4 March 2002. On this date, during his helicopter insertion for a reconnaissance and time sensitive targeting close air support mission, Sergeant Chapman’s aircraft came under heavy machine gun fire and received a direct hit from a rocket propelled grenade which caused a United States Navy Sea-Air-Land team member to fall from the aircraft. Though heavily damaged, the aircraft egressed the area and made an emergency landing seven kilometers away. Once on the ground Sergeant Chapman established communication with an AC-130 gunship to insure the area was secure while providing close air support coverage for the entire team. He then directed the gunship to begin the search for the missing team member. He requested, coordinated, and controlled the helicopter that extracted the stranded team and aircrew members. These actions limited the exposure of the aircrew and team to hostile fire. Without regard for his own life, Sergeant Chapman volunteered to rescue his missing team member from an enemy stronghold. Shortly after insertion, the team made contact with the enemy. Sergeant Chapman engaged and killed two enemy personnel. He continued to advance, reaching the enemy position, then engaged a second enemy position, a dug-in machine gun nest. At this time the rescue team came under effective enemy fire from three directions. From close range he exchanged fire with the enemy from minimum personal cover until he succumbed to multiple wounds. His engagement and destruction of the first enemy position and advancement on the second position enabled his team to move to cover and break enemy contact. In his own words, his Navy sea-air-land team leader credits Sergeant Chapman unequivocally with saving the lives of the entire rescue team. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, and the dedication to the service of his country, Sergeant Chapman reflects the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

JohnAChapmanRibbons

 

Always keep your Front Toward Enemy,

What’s your enemy?

Today’s Badass: Humbert “Rocky” Versace, O-3, U. S. Army, Special Forces

HumbertRVersace

 

Rocky Versace was born on July 2, 1937, in Honolulu, Hawaii. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point on July 1, 1955, and graduated with a commission as a 2LT of Armor on June 3, 1959. Versace attended the Armor Officer Basic Course from August to October 1959, and then Ranger School from October to December 1959. He served as a Medium Tank Platoon Leader with the 3rd Battalion, 40th Armor, in South Korea from March 1960 to April 1961, and then as a Tank Platoon Leader with Headquarters 3rd Infantry at Fort Myer, Virginia, from May 1961 to December 1962. Lt Versace next completed the Military Assistance Institute Course, the Intelligence Course at the U.S. Army Intelligence Center, and Language School before serving as an Intelligence Advisor to the Republic of Vietnam from May 1962 until he was captured and taken as a Prisoner of War while serving with Advisory Team 70 on October 29, 1963. Capt Versace was held until September 26, 1965, when he was executed by the Viet Cong. His remains have never been returned.

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His Medal of Honor Citation reads:

Captain Humbert R. Versace distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism during the period of 29 October 1963 to 26 September 1965, while serving as S-2 Advisor, Military Assistance Advisory Group, Detachment 52, Ca Mau, Republic of Vietnam. While accompanying a Civilian Irregular Defense Group patrol engaged in combat operations in Thoi Binh District, An Xuyen Province, Captain Versace and the patrol came under sudden and intense mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire from elements of a heavily armed enemy battalion. As the battle raged, Captain Versace, although severely wounded in the knee and back by hostile fire, fought valiantly and continued to engage enemy targets. Weakened by his wounds and fatigued by the fierce firefight, Captain Versace stubbornly resisted capture by the over-powering Viet Cong force with the last full measure of his strength and ammunition. Taken prisoner by the Viet Cong, he exemplified the tenets of the Code of Conduct from the time he entered into Prisoner of War status. Captain Versace assumed command of his fellow American soldiers, scorned the enemy’s exhaustive interrogation and indoctrination efforts, and made three unsuccessful attempts to escape, despite his weakened condition which was brought about by his wounds and the extreme privation and hardships he was forced to endure. During his captivity, Captain Versace was segregated in an isolated prisoner of war cage, manacled in irons for prolonged periods of time, and placed on extremely reduced ration. The enemy was unable to break his indomitable will, his faith in God, and his trust in the United States of America. Captain Versace, an American fighting man who epitomized the principles of his country and the Code of Conduct, was executed by the Viet Cong on 26 September 1965. Captain Versace’s gallant actions in close contact with an enemy force and unyielding courage and bravery while a prisoner of war are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect the utmost credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Today’s Badass: Neil C. Roberts, Petty Officer First Class (SEAL) U.S. Navy

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Neil Roberts was born on August 16, 1969, in Woodland, California. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy on September 14, 1987, and completed basic training at NTC Orlando, Florida, in November 1987. Roberts next attended Aviation Electrician’s Mate training at NATTC Millington, Tennessee, from November 1987 to May 1988, followed by service as an EP-3 Aries I aircrew member with Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron ONE (VQ-1) at NAS Agana, Guam, from June 1988 to January 1992. During this time he deployed with his Squadron in support of Operation Desert Shield from August 1990 to January 1991, and Desert Storm from January to March 1991. Petty Officer Roberts attended Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training with Class 184 at NAB Coronado, California, from January to October 1992, and then attended Jump School at Fort Benning, Georgia, in October and November 1992. His next assignment was with SEAL Team TWO at NAB Little Creek, Virginia, from November 1992 to June 1999, and during this time he deployed to San Vito, Italy, to support Allied Forces during the Bosnian War from November 1993 to May 1994, and to Sarajevo, Bosnia/Herzegovina, with the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force – Stabilization Force from September 1997 to October 1998. Petty Officer Roberts’ final assignment was with Naval Special Warfare Development Group (DEVGRU) at Dam Neck Annex, Virginia, from June 1999 until he became the first Navy SEAL killed in action during Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan, on March 4, 2002. He was buried at Prospect Hill Cemetery in York, Pennsylvania.

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His Silver Star Medal Citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a member of a special operations unit that conducted multiple insertions and combat operations deep behind enemy lines from 9 January to 5 March 2002. During this period, Petty Officer Roberts was assigned to a combined joint task force in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. Petty Officer Roberts performed superbly during several, in-extremis, combat operations and rescue of personnel, deep in enemy-controlled territory while under fire from enemy forces. On 3 March 2002, his unit planned an operation in the Paktia Province in support of Operation ANACONDA, the largest combat operation against enemy forces to date. On that evening, his unit was to conduct a clandestine insertion onto a 10,000 foot mountain peak to establish an over watch position. As the helicopter moved into position for the insertion, Petty Officer Roberts positioned himself on the helicopter ramp in order to expeditiously exit the helicopter, minimizing the threat to the aircraft and crew. Without notice, his CH-47 helicopter received a rocket-propelled grenade exploding through the body of the aircraft. Hydraulic lines showered the metal ramp with slippery fluid as the aircraft lurched violently from the unexpected assault. Petty Officer Roberts was thrown from the ramp of the helicopter falling onto the enemy infested mountain top just feet below. He immediately maneuvered to establish a defensive position and make contact with rescue forces. He defiantly fought the overwhelming enemy forces undoubtedly causing significant tolls to their numbers. Surrounded by superior fire power, he died on the battlefield from fatal combat wounds. Petty Officer Roberts’ bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty reflected great credit upon him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.